Why don’t businesses use webcams for video conferencing and video mail?

Posted on September 17, 2009. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

Consumers have quickly adopted webcams on home computers for video communications. This is evidenced by the rapid growth in Skype, YouTube videos, Vonei Meeting, and video chat programs. In the business world it seems natural that the proven tool of video conferencing would migrate from the expensive room based systems to computer webcam based video conferencing service. The power of sending video emails, instead of text emails, also appears to be a prime tool for businesses to communicate on a more personal level. So why have businesses been slow to migrate to these webcam based services?

The first barrier is of course having a webcam. It seems that 90% of new laptop computers have built-in webcams, and 100% of the netbooks have built-in webcams. For older laptops and desktops one can purchase external webcams for less than $50. There is a migration to wider video camera availability in the workplace, but without a conscious effort to use video many business people stick to text and audio phone calls.

The second barrier is some people want to “hide” behind the technology. It does make one pay attention when the other person can see you, and you have to make sure you are dressed appropriately. No more multi-tasking when the others can see you; it keeps you on your toes. If you are the boss this is something you should like. If you are an attendee and like to mulitask then the live video conferencing service on the computer may be undesirable.

A third barrier is incurring the cost of the service. Video conferencing with webcams is a widely available service that costs less than $50/month. The first in-person meeting that is canceled and held online instead will pay for the cost of the webcams and service. However some businesses are so focused on the small outlay for the service and webcams that they forget the cost savings. Or sometimes employees simply like traveling, and don’t want to replace it with online meetings.

A fourth barrier is simply that the technology is new, and unless there is wide spread use many people will shy away from new tools. Some of the video mail services are free, and yet they struggle to gain users. Why? One needs to have a webcam to record the video that is to be mailed. Without the webcam the free service cannot be used.

Are webcams the solution for increased business usage of video conferencing and video mail? Well I wouldn’t say the solution, but I would say they are enablers. With a webcam one can take advantage of video communications, and without it one is stuck with text and audio only.

Does anyone have a success story of deploying webcams in the business environment? We’d love to hear from you!

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

One Response to “Why don’t businesses use webcams for video conferencing and video mail?”

RSS Feed for The Vonei Blog Comments RSS Feed

I am rolling out a business which brings transparency through web based platform for lenders and consumers – Is the individual who posted the message above a Vonei supporter or employer – I would be willing to complete a number of transactions with a webcam as our primary method of communication – I can compare the transaction in which we use webcams with those which we do not and give you feed back – whether or not the live communication enhances/brings efficiency to our sale process – financial sales. Is the cost manageable? We work with around 30 new clients each month – so I could rapidly introduce your services/equipment to the consumer marketplace for the purpose of conducting business – let me know – I will add myself as a friend


Where's The Comment Form?

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: